Archive | September 14, 2015

The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation — Everyday Feminism

http://everydayfeminism.com/2013/09/cultural-exchange-and-cultural-appropriation/?utm_source=SocialWarfare&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=SocialWarfare

Are you enchanted?

Rebloging an old post on enchantment

Adventures and Musings of an Arch Druidess

The reason I am a pagan is the same reason I got my degree as a Naturalist or quite frankly do anything worth doing is for enchantment. I’ve been reading things about how the modern world is disenchanting. That life has lost its sense of what is enchanting or mystifying. I can only say then they are not paying attention.

If life is not enchanting for you, what is the point in being alive? Enchantment is all around us all the time you just have to look for it. If you are going through your day with your head down and never looking up there is something very wrong. There is a seagull staring at you that you missed or a dragonfly whizzing across the parking lot in front of your eyes that you just missed. There is a ladybug on the 11th floor window looking in at you. Did…

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Isis & the Re-enchantment of the World

Isiopolis

Golden Isis by Jane Marin. You can buy a copy here. Golden Isis by Jane Marin. You can buy a copy here.

As those of you who have been reading along know, I rarely comment on the ongoing discussions in the Pagan blogosphere. But this week, I am inspired by some current posts and commentary about the “re-enchantment of the world” over on Patheos Pagan and Witches and Pagans. I believe the discussion was started by John Beckett, whose work I often admire and who has written on this topic previously. Others added their own thoughts: Galina Krasskova: Re-Enchanting the WorldSara Amis: The World Isn’t Disenchanted. It’s YouIvo Dominguez Jr.: Already Enchanted.

Yet the heart-cry for re-enchantment is not new. We human beings have long complained about the world’s disenchantment. German sociologist Max Weber famously decried it in the early 1900s and before him Freidrich Schiller in the early 1800s. No doubt the discussion goes back much farther than that, too.

The disenchanted Max Weber The disenchanted Max Weber

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