Tag Archive | lost

Not exactly the Friday Philosopher of the Week

May I present: Albert Hofmann

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Hofmann

quotes:After some time, with my eyes closed, I began to enjoy this wonderful play of colors and forms, which it really was a pleasure to observe. Then I went to sleep and the next day I was fine. I felt quite fresh, like a newborn.

They do not know very good Latin, these botanists.

Through my LSD experience and my new picture of reality, I became aware of the wonder of creation, the magnificence of nature and of the animal and plant kingdom. I became very sensitive to what will happen to all this and all of us.

And you will just have to figure out how this relates to LOST.

Friday Philosopher of the Week

Ie back and it’s Edmund Burke. He will be appearing on LOST shortly.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Burke

He was a supporter of the “Colonies” Freedoms in the British Parliament during our Revolutionary War.

Quotes:

Better be despised for too anxious apprehensions, than ruined by too confident security.

All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

Hypocrisy can afford to be magnificent in its promises; for never intending to go beyond promises; it costs nothing.

Never despair; but if you do, work on in despair

Our patience will achieve more than our force.

The wise determine from the gravity of the case; the irritable, from sensibility to oppression; the high minded, from disdain and indignation at abusive power in unworthy hands.

A disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve, taken together, would be my standard of a statesman.

All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter

An event has happened, upon which it is difficult to speak, and impossible to be silent.

Bad laws are the worst sort of tyranny

Friday Philosopher of the Week

It’s time to play Friday Philospher of the week:

May I present Jean-Paul Sartre
http://www.philosophypages.com/ph/sart.htm

A lost battle is a battle one thinks one has lost.

Generosity is nothing else than a craze to possess. All which I abandon, all which I give, I enjoy in a higher manner through the fact that I give it away. To give is to enjoy possessively the object which one gives.

It is only in our decisions that we are important.

Man is condemned to be free; because once thrown into the world, he is responsible for everything he does.

Neither sex, without some fertilization of the complimentary characters of the other, is capable of the highest reaches of human endeavor.

Only the guy who isn’t rowing has time to rock the boat.

When the rich wage war, it’s the poor who die.

Friday Philosopher of the Week

May we present Immanual Kant:

http://www.friesian.com/kant.htm

Act that your principle of action might safely be made a law for the whole world.

All our knowledge begins with the senses, proceeds then to the understanding, and ends with reason. There is nothing higher than reason.

All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us.

By a lie, a man… annihilates his dignity as a man.

Happiness is not an ideal of reason, but of imagination.

In law a man is guilty when he violates the rights of others. In ethics he is guilty if he only thinks of doing so.

Intuition and concepts constitute… the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge.

If man makes himself a worm he must not complain when he is trodden on.

Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life.

Two things fill me with constantly increasing admiration and awe, the longer and more earnestly I reflect on them: the starry heavens without and the moral law within.

Friday Philosopher of the Week

Is Buddha. If you can figure out this one is related to “LOST” you really haven’t been paying attention:
http://www.souledout.org/wesak/storybuddha.html

All wrong-doing arises because of mind. If mind is transformed can wrong-doing remain?

An insincere and evil friend is more to be feared than a wild beast; a wild beast may wound your body, but an evil friend will wound your mind.

Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.

Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.

He who experiences the unity of life sees his own Self in all beings, and all beings in his own Self, and looks on everything with an impartial eye.

I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.

Friday Philosopher of the week

May I present Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury.

http://www.iep.utm.edu/s/shaftes.htm

“As accidental as my life may be, or as that random humor is, which governs it, I know nothing, after all, so real or substantial as myself”

“Truth is the most powerful thing in the world, since even fiction itself must be governed by it, and can only please by its resemblance”

‘Twas the saying of an ancient sage that humour was the only test of gravity, and gravity of humour. For a subject which would not bear raillery was suspicious; and a jest which would not bear a serious examination was certainly false wit.

Men’s first thoughts in this matter are generally better than their second; their natural notions better than those refin’d by study, or consultation with casuists.

How comes it to pass, then, that we appear such cowards in reasoning, and are so afraid to stand the test of ridicule? –

Now who is he and how does he relate to “LOST”?

Friday Philosopher of the Week

May we present David Hume:

http://www.philosophypages.com/ph/hume.htm

“Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous”

“Beauty is no quality in things themselves: it exists merely in the mind which contemplates them”

“When men are most sure and arrogant they are commonly most mistaken, giving views to passion without that proper deliberation which alone can secure them from the grossest absurdities”

“The Christian religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one”

“Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.”

“It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once.”

“The rules of morality are not the conclusion of our reason.”

And in case you haven’t figured it out yet all the philosophers so far mentioned have to do with “LOST”.

Friday Philosopher of the Week

Thomas Carlyle

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761564353/Thomas_Carlyle.html

A man’s felicity consists not in the outward and visible blessing of fortune, but in the inward and unseen perfections and riches of the mind.

A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.

A strong mind always hopes, and has always cause to hope.

All that mankind has done, thought or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books.

As a first approximation, I define “belief” not as the object of believing (a dogma, a program, etc.) but as the subject’s investment in a proposition, the act of saying it and considering it as true.

Egotism is the source and summary of all faults and miseries.

Everywhere the human soul stands between a hemisphere of light and another of darkness; on the confines of the two everlasting empires, necessity and free will.

Friday Philosopher of the Week

http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/philosophers/locke.html

John Locke

All mankind… being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions.

Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him.

I attribute the little I know to my not having been ashamed to ask for information, and to my rule of conversing with all descriptions of men on those topics that form their own peculiar professions and pursuits.

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

To love our neighbor as ourselves is such a truth for regulating human society, that by that alone one might determine all the cases in social morality.