Tag Archive | gaels

Dree yer ain Weird – a thought for a January morning of beginnings

Something most Scots have heard if their family still keeps its culture. To “Dree yer ain weird is to follow, practice, suffer your own destiny.

The underlying theme of growing up is to find out what you are meant to do and do it. But how many of us actually do, do it? Sometimes it’s easier to go with the flow or what our parent’s ideas of what we should grow up to be.

Oddly enough it goes handily with the Church of Scotland/Presbyterian view of predestination and the belief in free will that I was raised with at church and that doesn’t change with my paganism. I do think we choose our own individual destiny even if it’s in not choosing and going with the flow. It’s still a choice and you still exercised free will to not make a choice.

And in a weird way, coming out as a lesbian helped me make choices other than what my parents had in mind because once I had decided to throw out the conditioning to be straight and settle down and provide grandchildren, I was free to decide what I did want to do. I could decide who I lived with or if I lived with any one at all. I was free to choose my dreams. I’m free to write anything I get an idea to write about and thanks to technology be a published author.

It freed me to take the next step and follow what my grandmother had been teaching me and expand into a pagan life. It freed me to determine my own spiritual beliefs and ethics and not to blindly do what I was told without thinking about it. From what I read on Facebook, a lot of my high school contemporaries are still living their lives the way their parents did. The ones I find interesting are the ones who by some circumstance have made their own choices and are not the people they were in high school. Sometimes, not always the best choices but they made choices outside of what would have been pre-determined by their parents. I just found out a friend in high school who I really liked a lot and admired his creativity died of AIDS 10 years ago. He made his own choices to not grow up in Glendale and get married to a nice girl but to be a creative human being and from what I know of him in high school, come out, and I wonder if he regrets those choices or loved the time he had after making those choices.

I think we choose lessons to learn before we return to earth. Each time we return we choose new lessons. We choose the people we have those lessons with. Sometimes it’s learning that certain people are toxic and are working their own set of lessons.

The choices we make after we are born put us in circumstances to learn those lessons. And if we don’t complete the lesson then we get another chance if we would like in the next life. I hope I always choose lessons of love and creativity.

So do ye choose ta dree yer ain weird or are ye dreeing someone else’s?

Dree yer ain weird – A Pagan Blog post

Something most Scots have heard if their family still keeps its culture. To “Dree yer ain weird is to follow, practice, suffer your own destiny.

The underlying theme of growing up is to find out what you are meant to do and do it. But how many of us actually do, do it? Sometimes it’s easier to go with the flow or what our parent’s ideas of what we should grow up to be.

Oddly enough it goes handily with the Church of Scotland/Presbyterian view of predestination and the belief in free will that I was raised with at church and that doesn’t change with my paganism. I do think we choose our own individual destiny even if it’s in not choosing and going with the flow. It’s still a choice and you still exercised free will to not make a choice.

And in a weird way, coming out as a lesbian helped me make choices other than what my parents had in mind because once I had decided to throw out the conditioning to be straight and settle down and provide grandchildren, I was free to decide what I did want to do. I could decide who I lived with or if I lived with any one at all. I was free to choose my dreams. I’m free to write anything I get an idea to write about and thanks to technology be a published author.

It freed me to take the next step and follow what my grandmother had been teaching me and expand into a pagan life. It freed me to determine my own spiritual beliefs and ethics and not to blindly do what I was told without thinking about it. From what I read on Facebook, a lot of my high school contemporaries are still living their lives the way their parents did. The ones I find interesting are the ones who by some circumstance have made their own choices and are not the people they were in high school. Sometimes, not always the best choices but they made choices outside of what would have been pre-determined by their parents. I just found out a friend in high school who I really liked a lot and admired his creativity died of AIDS 10 years ago. He made his own choices to not grow up in Glendale and get married to a nice girl but to be a creative human being and from what I know of him in high school, come out, and I wonder if he regrets those choices or loved the time he had after making those choices.

I think we choose lessons to learn before we return to earth. Each time we return we choose new lessons. We choose the people we have those lessons with. Sometimes it’s learning that certain people are toxic and are working their own set of lessons.

The choices we make after we are born put us in circumstances to learn those lessons. And if we don’t complete the lesson then we get another chance if we would like in the next life. I hope I always choose lessons of love and creativity.

So do ye choose ta dree yer ain weird or are ye dreeing someone else’s?

thoughts on Chapter 2 of Mist Filled Path

People of Shapes, Children of the Mists

 

The Egyptians believed the soul had 5 parts: the Ib (Heart), the Sheut (shadow), Ren (Name), Ba (everything that makes you, you), Ka (your life force), Akh (your thoughts or intellect). The Old Irish believed the soul was in three cauldrons that maintained the health of the soul: the cauldron of warming (your life force) in your belly, the cauldron of vocation (that which dwells in your heart, and the cauldron of knowledge (wisdom) which was in your head.

All these parts of the soul can cause what has been referred to as soul loss and at times may need to be regarded as “lost”. Frank Mac Eowen has some techniques in this chapter for seeing whether your soul is missing anything and gives some advise about recovery of the soul and if you may need help doing that recovery.

He says that interaction with nature can help you integrate your spirit and shape us. That we shape ourselves by what we hold in our minds, that we shape ourselves and others by our actions. And that we are all shaped by things we can’t even grasp such as the elements.

He states that the Celtic people are water people and are shaped and built by the landscapes of the people, that the people of Wales, Brittany and Cornwall are people of the shore. Some are surrounded by water such as the people of the Ireland, Isle of Man, the inner and outer Hebrides. The people of Scotland are shaped by the lochs and that all Celts are influenced by the holy wells and streams. I’m not sure I agree with all of that because I think the Irish and the Scots are very much influenced by the earth also. The Irish live in a land that is green and fairly fertile and is somewhat gentle compared with the mountains and crags of the Scottish Highlands, People who flourish there have to have a different kind of mindset than a people where the land provides a slightly easier living. It’s why the Scots set sail on the sea and does make them more watery for having to get their living from the oceans but it grounds them and makes them feel the need to fight for their living. And it did translate to the need to explore and seek new places, in a new land. The US Navy was founded by a Scot after all, John Paul Jones.

Because of all this water he calls us the Children of the Mist, and he tells part of the story of Clan MacGregor and equates it with the Highland Clearances. As some one who is a MacGregor on both my mother and father’s sides of the family, I know there is much more to the MacGregors and why they were Children of the Mist and it wasn’t just their fight with the Colquhouns. If that were so the MacFarlanes would have been proscribed also since the Colquhouns were one of their favourite targets for cattle thievery and other activities. Just as the full moon was named MacFarlane’s lantern because that was when they did a lot of their raiding, the Children of the Mist, could disappear not just because the proscription which actually happened more than once, but from their ability to fade away out of sight. “Fight and run away and live to fight another day”. Something Clan MacDonald forgot and got walloped for by the English and the Campbells. The Clearances did, however, lead to the diaspora.

The English landlords were ruthless in clearing the lands for sheep and wool which was the backbone of the English economy. The troops would arrive in the night, give little time to pack and place you on ships to America, Australia and Ireland. And lest you think of returning, burn all that you had left behind. A fighting and proud people who depend on land for their identity were wiped away and forced to find new roots. And because the are a people who value stories they romanticized it to make the stories easier on their hearts. For a people whose greatest punishment was exile and their greatest good was hospitality these are traumas to the very soul of a people when they were exiled from their lands. The potato famine did much the same to the Irish. It wasn’t that there wasn’t enough food, it was that what good food like wheat was being sent to England and all the Irish were left with was the potato and the English weren’t exactly heartbroken to see the troublesome Irish have to leave.

And so two proud peoples went into exile and took with them a hate of the English, this lead to something like the Revolutionary War, the Law of Unintended Consequences in action and that behaviour of the English is still hated even today. The English taught the Scots and the Irish how to hold a grudge. Frank MacEowen says this and the historical and mythological migrations of the Celts led to having a spirit of longing, that it made us seekers. He may be right about that.

Celtic women in battle

I’m reading a fascinating book of my great-grandfather’s called, The Scottish Gael or Celtic Manners as preserved among the Highlanders. It was published in 1833. It was written by James Logan and our copy is very very old. It even has the address in it my great-grandparents were living at when they came in 1901. They were living over the bakery on Vermont Ave. Never knew that before. It’s one of the most peculiarly organized books I’ve ever read. Its chapters are broad topics and the only indication that the subject has changed is a few words at the top of the page.

That being said, I was trying to do some research on Highland holidays which turned out not to be there and got lost in the chapter on women in war that starts with Roman times and then goes forward.

At one point he is talking about how many could be raised as an army and states that Boudicca had 230,000 people in her army. The Romans only had 40,000 which might explain how they lost so badly to her.

He talks about Veleda, Aurinia, and Boudicca as being regarded as bearers of divine will and were venerated and followed into battle because they were touched by the divine. The Romans described the women as “the women attacked them with swords and axes and making a hideous outcry, fell upon all those who fled, as well as their pursuers, the former as traitors and the latter as enemies; mixing with the soldiers, with their bare arms, pulled away the shields of the Romans and laid hold of their swords, enduring the wounding and slashing of their bodies to the very last with undaunted resolution. It talks about them screaming and yelling at the men to excite them before going into battle. It also says they did the same when the Romans attacked the Druid’s sacred isle of Anglesea.

He says: “The great respect which Celts paid to their women was due to many amiable qualities and the estimation in which military acquirements were held by these people gave an incredible weight to the authority of the heroine…. Such women were regarded as having supernatural gifts and in the name of the deity they governed the people.”

From there he goes on to talk about the role of Bards and Druids in battle.

Love old books!