Archive | January 28, 2015

Day 2 of Pagan Studies Conference

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Jeffrey Albaugh

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Kahena,Jeffrey and William Blumberg

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Kimberly Kirner

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Wendy Griffin

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Francesca C. Howell

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Eeep! Me looking very up tight

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Joseph Greene, and Joan De Artemis

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Joan De Artemis

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Joseph H Greene

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Orion Foxwood

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Orion Foxwood

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Lauren Raine

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Alfred Surenyan

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Orion and Vivianne

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FETA and its attack on women: “gender rights.”

The Prime Directive

The so-called “International Bill of Gender Rights,” not recognized by the UN despite its grandiose name, is a good starting point to discuss the fact that the ideology pushed by FETAs (Female-Erasing Trans Activists) is profoundly genderist and anti-feminist in nature. Not surprisingly, it was written by two individuals who were socialized as men (one of the two, JoAnn Roberts, was a crossdresser).

Gender Identity Watch states that the goals of the IBGR are threefold:

(1) elevate a Man’s “Gender Identity” over a Woman’s Sex and Sexual Boundaries

(2) destroy Women-only space

(3) eradicate the Category of Sex.

So let’s begin:

#1: The Right To Define Gender Identity

We already start with a problematic term, “gender identity.” As I’ve already discussed, trans activists treat “gender identity” as an innate preference which causes gender expression, but how we think of ourselves is the result of our gender expression and how…

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I didn’t want to have to reblog this BUT IMBOLQ DOES NOT MEAN ‘IN THE BELLY’

Imbolc does not mean “in the belly!
Feb
2
The curse of Wikipedia strikes again. Now I’m seeing that Imbolc means “in the belly” all over the blogs for today’s holiday and I couldn’t figure out where the hell it was coming from until I looked in Wikipedia.

So I went to my handy Gaelic dictionaries. Number one the word Imbolc or any derivation there of does not appear in either Dwelly’s or MacClennan’s. Two very comprehensive Gaelic dictionaries which might explain why the holiday in Scotland is Fheill Bride not Imbolc.

The nearest words I could find were Im or Imb which are words for butter and the other words using those prefixes all have to do with milk or things done with milk. Normally you used to see that Imbolc had to do with ewe’s milk and that would make sense.

Bolg is a word for belly but if you use the logic of the two words together that would make the holiday butter belly and I sincerely doubt that.

So I looked at the alleged references used in Wikipedia. Most of them are New Age sources and not a Gaelic Dictionary in sight. Don’t you think if you are going to define a Celtic holiday with an allegedly Gaelic name you should at least consult a Gaelic dictionary?

So as I’m concerned Imbolc does not mean “in the belly” and how they got there mystifies me. It probably does have some thing to do with sheep and milk which makes a hell of a lot more sense.

PAGAN STOP USING WIKIPEDIA AS A SOURCE!!!!!