Archive | September 12, 2014

The Littlest Druid gets ready for Am-Foghar. (Autumn)

Aisling sat on the stone step outside the healer’s cottage. It was late in the afternoon and for once no one was in any of the healer’s cottages. The cottage next door where they kept the herbs and the medicines was still. The Herbalist was out on the moors collecting plants and everything that could be cleaned or mixed was done at the moment. The last grain harvest would start in a few days when the moon was full.

Aisling had nothing she was supposed to be doing. Lessons would start again after the harvest and the village was quiet, something that didn’t happen very often. Aisling was thinking about harvests and the different kinds of harvests. The year would be ending soon and food being gathered for the winter. The weavers were busy weaving and knitting warm woolen and linen cloth to be made into winter clothes and yarns of different weights and colours to be used for knitting by the fire when the snows came. They had just finished dying the wools. Aisling had enjoyed creating the dyes with the herbalist. She thought it was rather magical when something that was green like yarrow could create a yellow dye or how some crushed bugs could make a rich red. She had learned a lot in this year. She had been there when babies were born and when the new lambs entered the world. She was there when her friend, the priestess had gone into the West. She learned about healing herbs and how to make teas and medicines. She learned some new divination techniques with the Ogham sticks. She’d learned to interpret the flights of birds and the patterns of clouds. She’d learned poem after poem and lots of new songs. Her friend the Raven had taught her so much about birds and things like how to go quietly and how to laugh at herself.

The harvest would start on the day of equal day and equal night that also happened to be the full moon this year so they could have the feast that followed the first day of harvest when the sun set and the moon rose.

Aisling was missing the priestess who had gone to the West. Aisling thought she had learned more from her than when she was supposed to be in class or with her mentors. She missed their cream teas. The priestess always managed to charm Cook into a plate of s’gons and some cream or freshly churned butter. The Priestess had become a favourite with everyone in the Druid village even the Chief Druid spent long hours comparing notes about their villages and how they did things. She had been a truly wise woman and when she passed over the water the last time the whole village had sung her home. The priestess had left almost as big a hole as her Anam Cara had when she had left. She knew Anann, the bean sidhe had said they were both fine and that death was a part of life but it didn’t make the harvest of loss any easier when you wanted to share a secret or what you had learned during the day. It didn’t make thinking you saw them in the distance and realizing it was someone else any easier when you knew it wasn’t them and that you’re heart had fooled you again. She did wonder when she smelled the scent of lavender when there was no lavender anywhere nearby if someone was visiting so she had started saying hello and chatting when there was no one around to hear the conversation.

The cottage faced west and the sun was starting to set. Aisling closed her eyes and let the last warm rays of the sun bathe her in the warmth when someone sat down beside her. Aisling was almost afraid to open her eyes because so many big and strange people had sat down beside her to talk. Who was it this time? She sniffed the air and knew who it was and laughed.

“Why are you laughing, Aisling.” The Chief Druid chuckled softly because he knew why, he just had to ask.

“You know,” Aisling said, “I’ve had some pretty interesting people sit by me when I least expect it.”

The Chief Druid laughed, “So what were you thinking about so solemnly?”

“Everything I’ve learned this year. It’s almost Samhain and we’ll start over again before winter. I’ve learned so much but I’ve also lost things I didn’t expect to lose.”

“Like your Anam Cara and your friend, the priestess? You know, Latharn, thought you were something very special.”

“She did?” asked Aisling.

“She did, and I miss her too.” Said the Chief Druid. “She taught me a lot too.”

Aisling looked at the Chief Druid in astonishment. “She did. She taught me to face death with a full heart. She taught me to say when people mean something to them. She taught me to count my blessings.”

“I thought you knew all those things” Aisling looked at the Chief Druid with big eyes.

“I knew them but I didn’t KNOW them. Does that make sense?” Aisling thought about it and nodded her head.

“I think so.” Aisling said slowly.

“Latharn thought that someday you will be a great druid because you have an open heart and an open mind and because you love so completely.”

Aisling sat in stunned silence. Latharn had really thought that about her!

“She thought I should start teaching you some things that the others in your class aren’t ready for yet.”

Aisling was looking at the Chief Druid like an owlet that had been woken up suddenly. “Wwwhhyyy? Did she want you to do that?”

“Well, no one else your age or even among the other druids have had conversations with Brighid or Lugh or the Green Man or any of the others that have befriended you since you’ve been here.” Aisling was just staring.

“Think that would be a good thing to start after Samhain” asked the Druid in a teasing voice.

“Really? You want to teach just me? No one else?”

“Just you and maybe some of your friends will help sometimes.” He smiled to himself. This was going to be an interesting winter.

“I’ll let you digest that for awhile. I’ll see you at ritual. Would you recite a poem at ritual about what you are thankful for this year?”

Aisling nodded. She didn’t feel able to speak yet. She looked to the West just as the sun was setting over the far hills. She felt like someone far away had just smiled at her and maybe they had.

My soap box on vaccination or lack thereof

I grew up in an era where the only vaccines that were available were DPT and smallpox. The polio vaccine did not come until I was in first grade and we all had to line up at school to get our sugar cube only about a year later they discovered it didn’t work and we had to do it again. I grew up in classes with kids that were deaf or blind or had CP because their moms had been exposed to measles or mumps like my mom was.

My mom got the measles when she was pregnant with me and to keep the pregnancy she was given a drug named DES. She was also RH negative to my positive. I was born blind in one eye and partially sighted in the other eye. My identical twin was stillborn. I also had anatomical changes to my skeleton and had structural changes that ensured I could never have children because of the DES.

All that could have been prevented if the selfish idiot with the measles had stayed in bed and not gone out in public. There were many kids that were miscarried or born stillborn in those days before the measles vaccine.

I remember one of my friends had a huge battery powered hearing aid that her mother tied between two pony tails on the top of her head to hold it steady between her ears… every single day. She had to wear those two ponytails or it would be taped to her head like the boy down the hall had his taped. There were no nice miniature hearing aids and there were no nice sign language interpreters to help them learn. They had to depend on the hearing aid or lip reading. Steve, the other blind kid had to have a Braille type writer to write everything down way before computers. It was clunky and heavy and he had to lug it to every class with his cane tapping down the hall.

And now that people are not vaccinating their kids out of superstitious disproved nonsense and there are going to be children like me born. Autism is not caused by a vaccine. More and more evidence shows that there is a genetic component and I bet there will be found to be epigenetic causes in the future. Not vaccinating should be treated as a criminal act and prosecuted as such. There is no religious reason in any Bible that says that vaccination is bad. If you are using anything other than Christian Science and getting no medical care what so ever that’s one thing but anything else is a lie.

We need to treat not vaccinating as criminal act because there are demonstrable harms that can be clearly shown.

Vaccinating your kids and getting boosters yourself is being a responsible citizen to all people.

Look in this child’s eyes and tell her why it’s okay for her to be born this way because of your fear and selfishness.

Arresting Ronnie Kray

Wee Ginger Dug

I wasn’t going to post anything today, but for the past couple of days Scotland has been subject to the most intense napalming of fear and scares since the referendum campaign began. We are warned of meltdown on the markets, a plunging pound, share prices wiped out overnight. Prices in our supermarkets will double, all businesses will leave the country, and since we won’t have any currency we won’t even be able to club together to buy a cairry oot for the party we’ll have when Michelle McMoan moves south. And all this because a country which is too poor and insignificant to notice, which has oil reserves due to run out at 10.01 pm on Thursday, and has nothing to offer except a ticket on the Megabus to London, might decide to start governing itself. Something doesn’t add up.

Let us suppose that Scotland is indeed the high risk…

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