Adventures and thoughts on Corvid friends

From 7th Crow.com

Various version of the rhyme exist,but the basics are as follows:

  • One: Sorrow. An unhappy event. A change for the worse. Maybe loss or a death.
  • Two: Joy. A surprise. A change for the better. Sometimes the finding of something.
  • Three: Marriage. A celebration. Sometimes the birth of a female child. Other times some significant event around a daughter.
  • Four: Birth. Usually the birth of a male child. Sometimes a significant event surrounding a son.
  • Five: Silver. Sometimes costly. Usually a positive transaction.
  • Six: Gold. Wealth. Sometimes money. Maybe greed. Occasionally a negative transaction.
  • Seven: Something of spiritual significance. Often a secret. In some cases witchcraft, or the performing of sacred rites.

My Note (Usually something not to be spoken of ever. )

  • Eight: Something profound. Death, dying, or a glimpse of Heaven. A life-altering journey or experience.
  • Nine: Something sensual. Passion, or forbidden delight. In some versions this is corruption, in others it is closer to temptation.
  • Ten: Something extreme. An overwhelming sensation. Something paid in full.
  • Eleven: Uncertainty. Waiting. Wanting. May be in relation to a spiritual matter.
  • Twelve: Fulfillment. Riches (though not always of a material sort). A fruitful labor. Something completed. An end to a problem, or the answer to a question.

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These are the meanings associated with the birds of the Corvid family. Some of which seem to correspond to the same numbers in the tarot, not all but some.

That being said, I walk to work with a raven most mornings and I’d be in deeps sorrow constantly if this applied every time I see one of the corvidae. They are incredibly intelligent birds and according to the latest research remember human faces. This family also includes jays and magpies.

They tend to thievery if they think they can get away with it. I’ve had a Stellar’s Jay fly off with an entire cube of butter when we were fixing dinner on a camp out. I had just pulled it out of the cooler when the dang bird swiped it. I’ve also had them swipe whole pancakes and other bits of food off the table but the whole cube of butter took the cake. And I was less than 3 feet away when they did it.

When I was at CSUN one crow used to meet me outside the Phys Ed building 3 days a week and walk with me across campus to the Biology Building. He would walk with his wings folded behind him and look at me from the side. He looked very much like I imagine and Oxford don looks walking deliberately in his black robe. I used to talk to him as I walked if there was no one around. His bright eyes would twinkle at me as if he was plotting something. I knew it was deliberate because he didn’t do it to anyone else and he would wait in the tree outside until I came out. I have no idea what he got out of this as there was never any food involved but I did enjoy my end of it.

I had dealt with very few ravens until they moved into our neighborhood about 5 or 6 years ago. I love crows but I have decided I love the ravens more. I can see why the Haida thought Raven created the earth. And why other tribes associated them with the Trickster. They are incredibly intelligent and seem to have a very real sense of humour.

I’m always amused by their parenting skills. When a young bird reaches its time to leave the nest, they will boot them out and let them bitch to high heavens. They are usually just in the next tree watching this crocodile tear performance. For two days we hear the adolescent voice changing squawks of the young bird as he announces to the world about how abused he is. The cracks in the voice and the pitch changes remind you of a human boy. After about two days they usually get with the program although last year we had one that lasted a solid week in one of our sycamores. I felt for his parents over in the Magnolia.

The Celts associated them with war and the Morrigan for good reason. These opportunists would take full advantage of a battlefield buffet since they are carrion eaters as well as eating anything fresh they can find. They have been fighting for supremacy with the squirrels over the tangerines in our yard at the moment.

The Norse associated them with Odin. Hugin and Munin told him all the news he needed to know.

They eat berries and fruit and I had one scare the crap out of me one morning when I was waiting to cross the street to the bus station. There is a 7/11 there and a trash can which exploded and a raven hopped out from under the trash and proceed to give me such a look. He was only about three feet away and he obviously was in no way threatened by my presence but that may be because he was from my street. They have a fairly large range and I’ve seen ours at the market a few streets away fighting with some gulls over fries from the Der Weinersnitzel.

One thought on “Adventures and thoughts on Corvid friends

  1. love this! adding it to my Book of Flora and Fauna. I have a pair that nest near me and one of them comes and stands on the telephone pole outside our house and looks and me and squawks to high heaven when I am not heading the message that was given to me.

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